"Fagun Haway" explores 1952 in a new light with brilliant storytelling

“রাষ্ট্রভাষা বাংলা চাই, বাংলা চাই, বাংলা চাই!” – We sat there in the theatre with goosebumps, mesmerized how a scene with people shouting words could be so simple yet so powerful.

Fagun Haway is a movie about our Language Movement of 1952, inspired by Tito Rahman’s book “Bou Kotha Kou”. Directed by Tauquir Ahmed, the film features the extremely talented Nusrat Imrose Tisha and Siam Ahmed in the lead roles.

“Fagun Haway might seem like a quite serious film regarding ’52, but there is plenty of mainstream entertainment values embedded. It has romance, family drama and of course, humor”

The lead actor of the film Siam Ahmed added in an interview with Prothom Alo,

and indeed, we could not agree more.

The story

The movie starts by introducing the main characters- Dipti (Tisha), a medical college student, Nasir (Siam), a Dhaka university student and Pakistani police officer Jamshed Ali Khan (Yashpal Sharma) arriving in a ferryboat to the village of Chandranagar in East Pakistan.

Nasir and Dipti share beautiful moments on-screen- they become friends while working for a stage-play on Dinbandhu Mitra’s ‘Nil Darpan’ and soon fall in love. Meanwhile, the new officer at the police station, grumpy Jamshed Ali unfairly treats everyone. He not only forces people to speak Urdu, but also shows grave hatred towards anything related to Bangla language- from signboards written in Bangla to our people to even a mere bird humming the tune of “Bou Kotha Kou” simply because it’s Bangla.

Overall, the movie makes you go through a mixture of emotions. You laugh helplessly at the funny dialogues or hilarious expressions of Faruk Ahmed as a moulavi, you get angry and curse the Pakistanis for their cruelty towards East Pakistani people, you smile ear to ear as you see the two lovers unite, you sympathize with the Bangali police officers and the people for the torture they face, you sigh, seeing the irrational demands of Jamshed Ali Khan and most importantly, you feel the pride as the young rebels march on the streets of Chandranagar. Fagun Haway truly is a cinematic masterpiece that makes you feel as if you are a part of the journey itself!

The cinematography and acting

"Fagun Haway" shows an unexplored side of 1952 with brilliant storytelling

In addition to the story and concept of the movie, the cinematography and attention to details definitely won my heart! The recreation of Bangladesh from the 1950s was phenomenal. Starting from how Dipti(Tisha) wore sarees with a shorter aanchol similar to women in those days to how Tauquir Ahmed bought the Volkswagen 1954 model simply because the owner wouldn’t let him use it otherwise- every little detail was admirable. The costumes, the rural houses, tea-stalls and setups, the cinematic filters and color grading were aesthetically pleasing and take you back to the 1950s. Moreover, the rural Bangladeshi scenes shot with drones was stunning!

Tisha and Siam portrayed their characters beautifully in the film. Yashpal Sharma also fit his character perfectly and his acting as the evil police officer was spot-on. Saju Khadem, Faruk Ahmed, Abul Hayat and Fazlur Rahman Babu also blended in their characters beautifully.

The verdict

"Fagun Haway" shows an unexplored side of 1952 with brilliant storytelling

Fagun Haway was quite different from the conventional movies of today.

It was a beautiful watch, with various elements blended together that worked perfectly!

More movies on such historic events of our country should be made to infuse nationalism and patriotism into the mindsets of the new generation.

Fagun Haway is playing on Star Cineplex now; book your tickets and do not miss the opportunity to experience the glimpse of our struggle for our mother tongue (and a wonderful cinematic experience)!

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