As a woman who has never had to commute by bus, I am scared

If you don’t know already, Abrar Ahmed Chowdhury, a student of Bangladesh University of Professionals, was run over by a bus near Jamuna Future Park on Tuesday,19th March 2019. His ID card, covered in blood, was the first thing I saw when I came across this news. Apparently, this young man was crossing the road using the zebra crossing when he was hit and run over by a Suprobhat Paribahan bus. Yes, it’s happening again. After only 7 months of the heroic student protest demanding road safety, the same thing is happening again. If you aren’t shocked or surprised, you probably understand why.

“One hand, I feel extremely sad and angry. On the other hand, I just feel helpless because nothing has really changed,”

Said Nabil Ahmed when asked about today’s incident.

As a student myself, I was privileged enough to have a car for commute. More importantly, I was privileged to live very close to my university. So as someone who never really took a bus to travel somewhere, I cannot relate. As someone who took a rickshaw only to go from Kafrul to Mirpur 11, I do not know much about the roads of Dhaka.

However, as someone who always makes sure to use the zebra crossing even when it’s easier to cross without it, I am absolutely terrified.

As someone who looks both ways even when crossing a one-way street, I am frightened. Don’t get me wrong, there are times where pedestrians literally run to cross a street without looking left or right. And even if I were a conscious driver following every rule in the book, I wouldn’t have been able to save them from harm. But then, there are times when they die despite using the zebra crossing. There are times when they die despite being motionless people in a bus stop.

“I think this proves that even if pedestrians are aware of the rules, these accidents can and are still happening because of reckless drivers.”

Said Nima Mahal

So, to think that one might potentially die despite following the rules, to think one might die merely by existing on the streets of Dhaka is, in a word, terrifying.

I wanted to write an enormous section about traffic rules in other countries and its implementation, but what is the point really? What is the point of talking about law enforcement in a country that will stick to every bad thing in the world rather than embracing the good? What is the point of talking about following the laws when it isn’t the laws itself that are the issue, but the fact that they were never taken seriously?

And after today, what is the point of talking about traffic regulations in a country where drivers are as careless as commuters?

“Changes can come if tried. Our country has changed for the better in a lot of ways so why not this?”

Said Minhaz Shafi when asked about our governing system.

And it’s true. Many people have seen bikers wearing helmets and noticed the presence of traffic police in certain places. But that’s probably where it ended.

Afrin Zaman, a student who rides the bus to reach university told me about an accident she was recently in. “It was one of those bus racing incidents where a random bus driver starts driving rashly. No one died but a friend had to be taken to the hospital as a small shard of glass impacted a side of her body. It was scary,” said Zaman as she further mentioned how cheap and accessible the bus system is in Bangladesh. “I’ve always felt that the bus system was so easily accessible! The helpers also helped me get off on the road but despite all this, the risk is seriously undeniable,” added Zaman.

As a believer in change, I am hopeful change will come.

But as a realistic citizen of the People’s Republic of Bangladesh, I just feel sad.

Before writing this, I took time to read every news article I could find surrounding this incident. As of today, Mayor Atiqul Islam has pledged to build a foot over bridge named after Abrar, the victim, along with vowing to take action against the murderers. And to me, the actions said to be taken seemed fairly promising.

But then again, if you were in a country that faced the gruesome murder of two students, followed by a ground-breaking protest, maybe some reformation just to have the same thing happen the same way only 7 months later, how hopeful would you be?

*Names have been changed so to keep individuals’ identity anonymous.

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