A story of fire and crowd

Should you be called stupid for taking pictures in front of a burning building?

In a general sense, yes, you should be called stupid for taking pictures in front of a burning building.

Let me explain.

You’re not Clark Kent, Tintin, Anderson Cooper, or even Munni Saha- you don’t have the expectation of the world to report on it. However, your family do expect you to return home to them and you wont be able to if you stand under a fuming building, with debris (and people) falling from over your head and killing you or paralyzing you on the process.

What can you do if you find yourself around a blazing 22 storied edifice?

Firstly, if the fire seems recent, call 199. If you can’t remember it, you can still call 999. They’ll do the rest.

Read more: Fire Safety 101, What to do if you’re ever in a fire

Secondly, unless you have some sort of first aid training (which is frequently provided by the Red Crescent Society FYI), or the basic idea of how to help  during a fire fight, you clear out of the area. Like right at the moment.

There have been multiple arguments going around about how it’s the people who’s been of the most help during the calamities Dhaka has been facing since the beginning of civilization, Rana Plaza disaster being the most prominent example. What these arguments fail to realize is the differences of the situations.

The Rana Plaza disaster was of such a huge caliber, that professional help was outnumbered by the casualties. So the people helped. They helped with instruments, they lent hands for digging- carrying, they helped by providing with food,water and medicine, they donated blood, they did everything in their power to help the affected- dead or alive.

Of what use were those who held their cameras high and blocked 3/4th of the entire road to a building engulfed in fire?

The road was much more needed for the fire-fighters, the first-aiders and the medical teams to function effectively.

Before you start bringing up the people who actually helped, those who helped with carrying the waterline, or that kid who stayed on top of the pipe to stop it from leaking the entire time, or those who tried to keep the 1/4th of the road clear of the “curious people” so the ambulances or the fire trucks could come through, try to think of the number of them (around 200) against of those who just stood there and did nothing (nearly a thousand).

Before you start defending those who stood there and prayed, they could’ve prayed at home. They could’ve prayed at the mosque.

They could’ve not make it harder for the people who actually had family and friends stuck in the building. They could’ve not make the police come down to clear the entire Kamal Ataturk Road and they could’ve not make the ambulances and the fire trucks late.

They could’ve reduced the number of deaths and injured, if they weren’t some, in lack of better words, attention-hungry jerks.

Before you start defending those who stood there to watch and record people burning, breaking down, dying, jumping off the building to save themselves from the fire- remember what happened less than a month ago in Chawkbazar. Remember how the crowd, in collaboration with the unplanned roads and streets, hindered the help from getting there on time.

Remember how curiosity killed someone’s family, someone’s friends, someone’s loved one. Literally.

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